In the news today Sept 18

first_imgFive stories in the news for Tuesday, Sept. 18———FEDS LOOKING FOR JUDGE TO GUIDE PIPELINE PLANThe federal government is shopping around for a retired federal judge to help guide a renewed consultation with Indigenous communities on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The Federal Court of Appeal last month quashed the approval given to the project, saying the consultation with Indigenous communities wasn’t good enough. The Liberals are still considering whether to appeal the decision, but at the same time are looking at how they can do what the court said was lacking in order to get the pipeline work back underway. An official close to the plan said one option being closely considered is hiring a former senior judge, possibly a retired Supreme Court of Canada justice, to advise the government on what would constitute meaningful consultation with Indigenous communities to satisfy the conditions of the court.———ONTARIO SEEKS STAY OF RULING ON COUNCIL-CUTTING BILLThe Ontario government will be in court today seeking a stay of a court decision that stalled the province’s plans to cut Toronto city council nearly in half in the middle of an election campaign. Justice Edward Belobaba ruled that Bill 5, which slashed Toronto’s council to 25 seats from 47, violated freedom of expression rights for candidates and voters. The stay application could result in Belobaba’s ruling being put on hold until a formal appeal is heard.———RCAF SHORT 275 PILOTSThe Royal Canadian Air Force is contending with a shortage of around 275 pilots. It also needs more mechanics, sensor operators and other trained personnel. The Air Force says it is working to address the deficiencies and that they have not negatively impacted operations. Still, officials acknowledge the situation has added pressure on Canada’s flying corps and will represent a real challenge for the foreseeable future.———LAWYERS CALL ON OTTAWA TO ADDRESS BORDER POT ISSUESImmigration lawyers who specialize in border issues say the federal government needs to help Canadians who take part in the legal cannabis industry with issues that could arise entering the United States. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency last week said legalization in Canada won’t change the fact that American laws treat marijuana as a banned substance, and industry insiders as drug traffickers. The lawyers say it should fall to Ottawa to help travellers who are taking part in a perfectly legal business enterprise cross the border.———GREAT WHITE SHARK TAGGED OFF N.S.Scientists have successfully tagged a great white shark for the first time in Atlantic Canadian waters. Federal fisheries officials say Heather Bowlby of the shark unit at Halifax’s Bedford Institute of Oceanography tagged the shark off southwest Nova Scotia last week. They say the tag information will assist in understanding white shark movements. Bowlby is expected to discuss her research with the media today.———ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:— G7 environment, oceans and energy ministers will meet in Halifax on the theme of “Working Together on Climate Change, Oceans and Clean Energy.”— The Canadian Armed Forces conducts a major air disaster exercise in Yellowknife named Exercise Ready Soteria as part of Operation Nanook 2018.— Statistics Canada releases the monthly survey of manufacturing for July.— Arguments to be heard in Edmonton in the sentence appeal of Steven Vollrath, who was convicted and sent to prison for 12 years in the abduction of Richard Suter, who had driven through a restaurant patio and killed a two-year-old boy.— Football player Jerome Messam to appear in court in Calgary on a voyeurism charge. It’s alleged he videotaped a consensual sexual encounter in November 2016 without the woman’s knowledge.— The Kraft Hockeyville 2018 winning community of Lucan, Ont., hosts an NHL pre-season game between the Toronto Maple Leafs and Ottawa Senators.— The RCMP will hold a tree planting ceremony in Ottawa as part of an expression of regret for the internment of Italian Canadians during the Second World War.— Canadian musician Bryan Adams appears before the House of Commons Canadian Heritage committee to discuss remuneration models for artists and creative industries.last_img read more

7 killed as bus rams into truck on AgraLucknow Expressway

first_imgMainpuri (UP): A private bus on its way to Varanasi from Delhi rammed into a truck on the Agra-Lucknow Expressway, killing seven passengers and injuring 34 others, police said on Sunday.The accident took place on Saturday night when the bus, carrying 41 passengers, was going to Varanasi. Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath has expressed profound grief over the incident. In a tweet, the Chief Minister has asked the officials concerned to make all necessary arrangements for those who sustained injuries in the incident. The injured have been admitted to Saifai Hospital where the condition of 12 was stated to be serious. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Superintendent of Police Ajay Shanker Rai said the driver of the bus was among those injured. The identity of the deceased and the injured persons is being ascertained, he added. Meanwhile, Samajwadi Party president Akhilesh Yadav said in a tweet that he visited the injured in hospital. “I am saddened post my visit to the bus accident survivors. Despite collecting tolls this government neglects its responsibility to ensure safe highways. They should focus on monitoring & providing adequate policing/systems to protect travellers.Condolences to the aggrieved families,” Akhilesh said in the tweet.last_img read more

New UN envoy for Iraq starts work in Baghdad

12 November 2007Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s new Special Representative for Iraq, Staffan de Mistura, has arrived in Baghdad where he immediately assumed his responsibilities as the top United Nations envoy in the country. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s new Special Representative for Iraq, Staffan de Mistura, has arrived in Baghdad where he immediately assumed his responsibilities as the top United Nations envoy in the country.“I look forward to carrying out my responsibilities,” said Mr. de Mistura, whose mandate derives from Security Council resolution 1770, which extended and expanded the mandate of the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI).The envoy pledged to work “in the service of the Iraqi people.”Recognizing Iraq’s unique challenges, Mr. de Mistura, who arrived on Sunday, also vowed “to fulfill UNAMI’s mandate by ensuring maximum UN engagement with both the Government and people of Iraq.”Mr. de Mistura, who succeeded Ashraf Qazi, has served in Iraq in various capacities in the past, including as the Secretary-General’s Deputy Special Representative. read more

Couple killed in Highway 6 crash identified

A man and woman from Hamilton are dead following a head on crash on highway 6 last night near Mount Hope.An autopsy was done today to confirm their identities, and we have learned that 64-year old John Anderson and 53-year old Dulce Bustria, both from Hamilton, died in that crash.It was just before 7 o’clock Saturday night when a man driving a Honda on Highway 6 near Chippewa road crossed the line, veered into oncoming traffic and hit a pickup truck head-on.A Chevy Cruze then rear-ended the pick-up.The man driving the Honda died on scene along with the woman in the passenger seat. A man and woman in the pickup truck were taken to Hamilton General with serious injuries.A woman in the third vehicle was treated for non-life threatening injuries.The highway was closed several hours Saturday night during the police investigation. 00:00:00 | 00:00:00::Projekktor V1.3.09 read more

US sales of previously occupied homes dipped in June but remain near

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – U.S. sales of previously occupied homes slipped in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but remain near a 3 1/2-year high.The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales fell 1.2 per cent last month from an annual rate of 5.14 million in May. The NAR revised down May’s sales, but they were still the highest since November 2009.Despite last month’s dip, home sales have surged 15.2 per cent from a year ago. Sales have recovered since early last year, buoyed by job gains and low mortgage rates.Still, mortgage rates have surged in recent weeks over concern that the Federal Reserve could slow its bond-buying programs later this year. The Fed’s bond purchases have helped keep long-term mortgage and other rates low.Higher mortgage rates slowed sales last month of higher-priced homes in states such as California and New York, the Realtors group said.The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage leapt to 4.46 per cent by the end of June from 3.81 per cent at the end of May. The rate was 4.37 per cent last week.That rate increase could hamper sales in coming months, economists said. But most expect housing to continue to recover, though at a slower pace.“There’s little doubt the housing market slowed in the summer as mortgage rates rose,” Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist at BTIG LLC, an institutional brokerage, said in a note to clients. “Housing is still expected to grow and contribute to economic output. It just may not be at the pace we’ve seen of late.”Sales of previously occupied homes in June reflect contracts that were mostly signed in April and May, when mortgage rates were lower. Rising rates can cause some signed contracts to fall through if buyers no longer qualify for mortgages at higher rates.The one factor that’s likely most holding back sales is a limited supply of homes available. Though more sellers put their homes on the market in June, the supply remained unusually low — nearly 8 per cent less than a year ago.At the current sales pace, the number of homes for sale would be exhausted in 5.2 months. That’s below the six months’ supply that’s consistent with a healthy housing market.Another concern is that first-time buyers, who usually drive healthy markets, aren’t participating as much in the current recovery. They made up only 29 per cent of buyers in June, below the 40 per cent that is typical. Since the housing bubble burst more than six years ago, banks have imposed tighter credit conditions and required larger down payments. That’s made it harder for first-time buyers to qualify for mortgages.Still, mortgage rates remain relatively low and home prices remain affordable despite rising in the past year. And higher mortgage rates could encourage some potential buyers to come off the sidelines and purchase homes before rates rise further.The strength in housing this year has offset weaknesses elsewhere in the economy, like manufacturing and business investment. Rising home sales tend to lead to more spending at furniture and home supply stores.Homebuilders have also stepped up construction in the past year, creating more construction jobs. In June, they applied for permits to build single-family homes at the fastest pace in five years. by Christopher S. Rugaber, The Associated Press Posted Jul 22, 2013 10:09 am MDT US sales of previously occupied homes dipped in June but remain near 3 1/2-year high read more

UN chief stresses need for urgent global action as Ebola continues deadly

“Ebola is a huge and urgent global problem that demands a huge and urgent global response,” Mr. Ban told reporters in New York. “The people and governments of West Africa are demonstrating significant resilience, but they have asked for our help.“Dozens of countries are showing their solidarity. But we need to turn pledges into action. We need more doctors, nurses, equipment, treatment centres and medevac capacities.”The Secretary-General appealed to the international community to provide the $1 billion that will enable the UN and partners to “get ahead of the curve” and meet the target of reducing the rate of transmission by 1 December.Mr. Ban’s call to action echoes the stark warning issued to the Security Council last week by Anthony Banbury, head of the UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), who said the world must move quickly to ensure that at least 70 per cent of all people infected with Ebola are getting treatment by 1 December, and that 70 per cent of all burials occur without contamination by that date. Failing to reach those targets would mean “we fail entirely. With each passing day…the number of people infected grows exponentially,” he said.The latest figures from the UN World Health Organization (WHO) indicate a total of 8,997 cases in seven countries [Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Spain and United States] and 4,493 deaths. The disease has taken its toll on healthcare workers, with 427 infected and 236 dead. Mr. Ban saluted the courage of the medical and support personnel working on the front-lines to respond to the crisis, and offered condolences to the family of Sudanese national AbdelFadeel Mohammed Basheer, a lab technician who was the second person from the UN Mission in Liberia to succumb to the disease.In addition to the recent establishment of UNMEER to coordinate and scale up action, Mr. Ban said he has formed a Global Ebola Response Coalition.“Ebola can be beaten if we work together effectively. We all have a responsibility to act,” he stressed. WHO is warning of a continuously deteriorating situation in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – the three most affected countries. “Our data shows that cases are doubling every four weeks. The disease is still widespread in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and there is persistent transmission of the virus,” Dr. Isabelle Nuttall, WHO Director for Global Capacities, Alert and Response, told a news conference in Geneva. An increase in new cases in Guinea is being driven by a spike in cases in the capital, Conakry, and the nearby district of Coyah. In Liberia, there is almost certainly significant under-reporting of cases from the capital, Monrovia, while in Sierra Leone, intense transmission is still occurring in the capital city of Freetown and its surroundings. A sign indicating the three wards in the IFRC Ebola Treatment Centre outside of Kenema, Sierra Leone. Photo: Anna Jefferys/IRINThe total number of operational laboratories in the three countries will increase in the coming weeks, as a Russian Mobile Laboratory becomes operational in Guinea, and a Public Health England laboratory begins to provide diagnostic testing in the Western Rural area of Sierra Leone.Dr. Nuttall added that the number of cases is expected to top 9,000 this week and the number of deaths will hit 4,500. Also today, the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) warned that Ebola is wiping out gains in safe motherhood made in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. “The reality is that pregnant women are facing a double threat – dying from Ebola and from pregnancy or childbirth, due to the devastating impact of Ebola on health workers and health systems,” said UNFPA Executive Director, Babatunde Osotimehin. “Ebola is not only killing those infected, but also those affected. Pregnant women and girls are at greater risk.” An estimated 800,000 women in these three countries should give birth in the next 12 months. All will require antenatal, delivery and postnatal care and related emergency obstetric support, the agency stated in a news release. But many pregnant women are afraid to visit or turned away from overstretched health facilities. Of these women, more than 120,000 could die of complications of pregnancy and childbirth, if the required life-saving emergency obstetric care is not urgently provided. “The situation for pregnant women in Ebola crisis countries is devastating. Gains in maternal health and family planning are being wiped out and women are desperate for information and services to protect their health and that of their babies,” said Dr. Osotimehin. He called for urgent funding to meet the reproductive health needs of women and mothers in the three countries, adding that UNFPA needs $64.5 million for this effort in the next three months read more

Week 18 NFL Elo Ratings And Playoff Odds Wild Card Edition

With the NFL’s regular season concluding last Sunday, our Elo ratings have, in some ways, completed their broadest purpose: to track the league’s horse race by providing a weekly top-to-bottom ranking of all 32 teams. (You can see the final regular-season ratings below.) By dint of their historically great Elo rating, the Seattle Seahawks might still rank first in our post-Super Bowl rankings even if they lose in the divisional round of the playoffs — but that will be of cold comfort to fans in Seattle. As Al Davis might say, all that matters now is winning.Even so, it will be useful to continue the ranking process in the postseason (despite almost two-thirds of the league being inactive until September). And going into the playoffs, the Seahawks are indeed the top-rated team in the NFL, by no small margin; Elo thinks they’d be favored by 2.9 points over the No. 2 New England Patriots on a neutral field. In fact, Seattle’s 1760 Elo rating is the fifth-highest mark any team has carried into the playoffs since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger, trailing only the 2007 and 2004 editions of the Patriots, the 1997 Green Bay Packers and Washington in 1983.Having the NFL’s best Elo rating at the end of the regular season was a good formula for Seattle last season, as it ended up winning the Super Bowl from the pole position at the start of the playoffs. And up until the mid-to-late 1990s, regular-season Elo champs enjoyed a remarkable amount of postseason success, going on to win the Super Bowl 48 percent of the time between the 1970 and 1996 seasons.But starting with the 1997 Packers (who lost a classic Super Bowl to the Denver Broncos), things have gone south for top-rated regular-season squads. They failed to win each of the next six Super Bowls, after never having gone more than four straight years without winning in the past. And, regular-season Elo champs — following a brief renaissance thanks to the top-rated Patriots’ back-to-back wins in 2003 and 2004 — went eight more seasons in a row without a title between 2006 and 2012. Since 1997, Elo’s top team at the end of the regular season has won just three Super Bowls in 17 tries, good for an 18 percent success rate.It’s hard to say whether this is an anomaly or part of a larger trend toward more randomness in the NFL playoffs. (For what it’s worth, the average pre-playoff Elo of top-rated teams since 1997 was 1726; from 1970 to 1996, that number was 1711. So, it’s not as if the league is suddenly producing less dominant regular-season teams.) It’s also hard to say whether this is necessarily a bad thing for the football-watching public. (Would we really want a setup like this instead?) But on the eve of the postseason, it’s worth noting that being in the Seahawks’ position seems to be worth a lot less now than in the past.Even so, our Elo simulations have Seattle as the clear Super Bowl favorites, with a 35 percent probability of winning it all — about 13 percentage points higher than that of the Patriots. (Meanwhile, betting markets consider the two teams co-favorites, at about 24 percent apiece after removing the vigorish.) The regular season’s final week widened that gap after New England lost at home against the Buffalo Bills — a fact that betrays one of the limitations of our Elo system.With the Broncos losing to the Cincinnati Bengals on Dec. 22, the Patriots had already clinched the AFC’s top seed regardless of what happened against Buffalo. New England rested a number of starters and used quarterback/MVP candidate Tom Brady sparingly in its 17-9 loss. It was a result that really shouldn’t be held against the Patriots, but our Elo methodology doesn’t make exceptions for such games because it has no way to set them apart from more meaningful outcomes. Consequently, the Patriots lost 43 points of Elo rating last week (while Seattle gained five points for their victory over the St. Louis Rams), and the difference between Nos. 1 and 2 in our simulated Super Bowl probability increased by 7 percentage points.A solution to this kind of quandary might be to tweak the Elo K-factor for each game using a leverage index-style metric, like the “swing” number FiveThirtyEight contributor Mike Beuoy uses to measure the playoff implications of a given matchup. Such a mechanic would elegantly put more emphasis on games in which teams had a great deal on the line, while simultaneously downplaying the importance of relatively meaningless games like Sunday’s Patriots-Bills tilt. Until then, however, Elo can only use the information it’s given, and that means we’re probably undervaluing the Patriots’ Super Bowl chances here.Elo finished the regular season with a solid 129-108-4 record against the Vegas point spread — not a bad showing for a very simple system in its first year of use. But if history is any guide, it was also probably a huge fluke. Measuring its performance in the past against the spreads archived at Sunshine Forecast‘s website, 2014 represented Elo’s best season against the spread since 1989. So, while we were lucky to have begun using the system in what looks like a great year by its standards, please don’t use these numbers to place bets.Even so, it’s always interesting to see where our algorithm differs from the lines set by sportsbooks in Vegas. This week, Elo and Vegas mostly see eye to eye, aside from the Carolina Panthers-Arizona Cardinals game Saturday afternoon. The books generally dislike the Panthers even more than they do the Cardinals, so you might expect Carolina to scrape by on home-field advantage alone (this is essentially why Elo has the Panthers as slight favorites). However, the Vegas consensus sees the Panthers favored by six over the Cardinals, who have lost both of their games since third-stringer Ryan Lindley took over as the team’s starting quarterback. So, this may be a case of Elo giving the Cardinals too much credit for their early-season games under injured QBs Carson Palmer and Drew Stanton.Finally, while we’re on the subject of comparing Elo to Vegas, we’ll leave you with a comparison of Vegas’s preseason over/under win totals — namely, those released by the LVH Superbook — against the simulated win totals for each team using its preseason Elo rating (which were just a regressed-to-the-mean version of its rating from the end of 2013). There was a relatively high correlation (r = 0.82) between both sets of win totals, and both were (rightly) heavily regressed toward an 8-8 record for every team, but Vegas’s numbers had a slightly smaller root mean square error (RMSE) against actual win totals this season, narrowly beating Elo 2.4 to 2.5.A bigger takeaway? The fact that things were so close between Vegas and something as simple as a regressed version of the previous year’s Elo ratings probably speaks to Brian Burke’s mantra that preseason predictions are relatively worthless across the board. Whenever we think we have football figured out, there’s always something to remind us how little we actually know. read more

Gardaí appeal for help in finding Letterkenny killer

first_imgGARDAÍ INVESTIGATING THE murder of a man in Donegal have appealed for anyone who saw anything unusual in the area to come forward.The body of Bogdan Michalkiawicz was discovered at Westside Apartments off the Main Street in Letterkenny on Wednesday morning.Gardaí say the man was last seen alive at around lunchtime on Monday afternoon. Investigators have asked anyone who saw anything suspicious in the Westside Apartments, Lower Main Street and Pearse Road area of Letterkenny between Friday 10 May and the evening of Tuesday 14 May to come forward.The incident room at Letterkenny Garda station can be contacted at 074 9167170.Previously: Man’s body found in Letterkenny apartment >last_img read more

Separate light rail vote gets support

first_imgA majority of C-Tran’s board of directors appears to be ready to give local voters a direct say over the future of a new Columbia River Crossing.The $3.6 billion project won a key endorsement earlier this week when a high-level advisory committee backed a 10-lane replacement for the existing Interstate 5 Bridge. However, the co-director of the crossing project said this week that the bridge won’t get built unless C-Tran comes up with an estimated $2 million to $3 million per year to operate an extension of Portland’s light-rail transit system through downtown Vancouver.And that will require voters on the Washington side of the river to boost the sales tax next year.“It’s one project,” said Don Wagner, Washington co-director of the bistate crossing office. “And if a vote were to occur that said, ‘No’ to that $2 million, then, no, I can’t move forward.”Voters will not be asked to construct the line, simply to operate and maintain it.Vancouver Mayor Tim Leavitt, a longtime advocate of light rail, said he believes voters will see they’re getting a good deal and approve the measure. “I think it’s fair to say a one-penny sales tax increase on a $10 purchase is pretty minimal to support the future of public transit in our community,” he said.However, C-Tran’s board isn’t going to make it easy.Until recently, C-Tran officials had proposed bundling the money necessary to operate light rail with a 0.3 percent sales tax increase that would include a potpourri of transit improvements throughout the county. The idea was to broaden the measure so that voters in Battle Ground, for example, would directly benefit from enhanced bus service with a successful vote. In return, light rail would be extended to downtown Vancouver.last_img read more

Petit retakes lead on the way to Nikolai

first_imgA team leaves the gate at the Iditarod ceremonial start on Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Photo by Patrick Yack/Alaska Public Media)After briefly relinquishing the lead Monday, Nicolas Petit is back in front on the way to Nikolai. But, the pack isn’t far behind.Dallas Seavey, Wade Marrs, Mitch Seavey and Hugh Neff are within 10 miles of Petit.The Nikolai checkpoint is 263 miles into the race.So far, two mushers – Jan Steves of Willow and Martin Koenig of Montana – have scratched. Both scratched at the Skwentna checkpoint.last_img read more

Tanner crab fishery to open in Kodiak for first time since 2013

first_imgTanner crab. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia)This year will be the first opening for Tanner crab the Kodiak management area has seen in a few years.Listen nowNat Nichols, Alaska Department of Fish and Game area management biologist for the Groundfish, Shellfish & Dive Fisheries, says the last opening was in 2013. He said ADF&G conducts an extensive trawl survey program between Dutch Harbor and Kodiak focused on tanner crab in the Gulf of Alaska.“This year we did 363 stations. About 200 of those are in Kodiak, so quite a few stations around Kodiak to assess tanner crab abundance,” Nichols said. “Once we work up those survey results, we compare them to abundance thresholds that are set out in the harbor strategy and regulation and that gives us guidance as to whether we can proceed with the fishery.”Nichols said abundance levels have now reached the point that the Tanner crab fishery can open again, and ADF&G recently set the guideline harvest levels.“We’re looking to target 260,000 pounds from the east side section and 140,000 pounds from the southwest section, and those’ll be the only two sections that are open this year,” Nichols said.Nichols sid the fishery opens January 15.Meanwhile, the Dungeness crab season, which opened in May and June, closed last week.“We had five vessels participating and looks like we’ve wrapped up with about 180,000 pounds of Dungeness across the dock. Harvest in Kodiak is pretty variable over the last ten years,” Nichols said. “We’ve had season less than 100,000 pounds and we’ve had seasons over a million, so this year’s kind of right in there but sort of in the lower portion of what we’ve seen over the last decade.”Nichols said some of the decrease in participation could be due to this year’s good salmon season. He said fishermen may have not felt such a need to turn to Dungeness to supplement their incomes.last_img read more

Mumbai Foundation stone for new liquid cargo jetty laid at

first_imgMumbai: Union Minister of State for Shipping, Mansukh Mandaviya on Friday laid the foundation stone for development of an additional Liquid Cargo Jetty at Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT) in Mumbai. Built at a cost of over Rs 300 crore, the project will cater to the increased demand for handling liquid cargo like edible oil, LPG, molasses and other chemicals. Also Read – Congress MLA Shivakumar moves High Court seeking protection from arrest Advertise With Us Present at the occasion, Minister Mansukh Mandaviya said, “The Prime Minister Narendra Modi has laid focus on port-led development. Keeping this in view, India’s ports are being developed and modernized in line with global best practices.” The minister further added that the new terminal will increase JNPT’s present capacity of 6.5 Million Tonnes Per Annum to an additional 4.5 Million Tonnes per Annum.last_img read more

RBI vs Modi govt From liquidity to relief for MSME sector key

first_imgThe Reserve Bank of India’s 18-member board met under governor Urjit Patel amid speculation of several policy and procedural flashpoints with the central government. The sagging economic growth, which sorely needs an infusion of fresh liquidity to grow green shoots, has been the chief concern of Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley.But the RBI’s worries have been about the long-term vulnerability of its monetary policy to domestic and global contingencies. The board, including two political nominees – S Gurumurthy and Satish Marathe – settled into a long session on Monday that saw some extent of give-and-take.In the tense run-up to the meeting, there was speculation even about Patel’s exit. The key takeaways from the meeting are:Liquidity: The RBI will inject Rs 8,000 crore into the system by buying government securities on November 22. “Based on an assessment of prevailing liquidity conditions and also of the durable liquidity needs going forward, it has decided to conduct the purchase of the following government securities under Open Market Operations for an aggregate amount of Rs 80 billion on November 22, (Thursday),” it said in a statement. This is expected to help ease the tight liquidity situation caused by the IL&FS defaults. The central bank directs the eligible participants to submit offers in electronic format on the RBI Core Banking Solution (E-Kuber) system on November 22.Prompt Corrective Action (PCA) framework: The central bank will revisit its insistence that financial institutions need to take immediate corrective action by one-time provisioning to deal with non-performing assets (NPAs). The government had taken the stand that the onetime provisioning requirement pushed banks to the red, reducing their capacity to lend.Economic capital framework: The RBI will form an expert panel to examine its economic capital framework, a vocal demand of the North Block. The panel could prompt a rethink of what adequate capital reserves for the central bank would be. This constitutes a substantial shift in the RBI’s position that it was up to it to decide the adequacy of the size of its reserves in the light of the prevailing domestic and global economic situation.Relief for MSME sector: The board has urged the RBI to consider a scheme to restructure the stressed standard assets of mini, micro and medium enterprises or MSME borrowers with total credit facilities of up to Rs 25 crore. The MSME sector is the pivot of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s election eve push to reignite economic growth. Modi’s 59-minute loan programme demands deep reserves. The government has stuck to the view that the MSME sector, which employs about 120 million people and plays a vital role in the economy and employment generation, needs extra support after the demonetisation and the introduction of the Goods and Services Tax that have affected their liquidity.Next board meeting: The next board meeting has been set for December 14.last_img read more

Legion Calls Everything into Question with its Most Stunning Episode Yet

first_img Don’t Hold Your Breath For Noah Hawley’s ‘Doctor Doom&…How ‘Legion’ Uses Superpowers to Explore Mental Illness Stay on target So. That episode of Legion last night sure was… something, huh? There’s so much to unpack; it’s hard to figure out where to even start. All I know is that I really liked it. “Chapter Four” was the series’s most visually abstract, disorienting episode yet, even more than the pilot. Over the course of an hour, it made us question everything we’d assumed about the world the last three episodes have shown us.Right away, the show knocks us off balance by throwing us a character we haven’t met before. Played by Jemaine Clement, the man narrates directly to us about what kind of story we’re about to see. He is surrounded by a vibrant blue and white background we can’t quite make out. As the camera zooms out, we see he’s in an ice room suspended in mid-air. Before we have a chance to really deal with that, the show rejoins the action at Summerland.David is still unconscious from the drugs they gave him at the end of last week’s episode. Ptonomy searches David’s memories and can’t find his consciousness anywhere. He deduces David must have created some kind of astral plane in his subconscious. Because the show hasn’t been trippy enough so far. Syd asks one of the bigger questions the episode deals with but doesn’t fully answer. Are they actually in the real world, or are they still in David’s mind? He’s an incredibly powerful mutant; it’s certainly possible he created a convincing projection for them to walk around in.Dan Stevens as David Haller (Photo via FX)For the most part, it doesn’t seem like it, and Ptonomy reassures Syd that they are in the real world. With David unconscious, Melanie sends them out to explore David’s past in the real world to see if they can figure out how to bring him back. We also meet Kerry, who goes with them. Kerry shares a body with Cary. The two can separate from each other, but they feel everything that happens to the other one. Also, Kerry only ages when she’s outside of Cary’s body. Just one of those minor details that make Legion so cool. Though they appear to be in the real world, Syd keeps seeing the Angriest Boy in the World, which makes me question everything we’ve seen in this episode.The group visits David’s old therapist’s office and find a beaten up tape recorder. We knew that recorder was important by the way David kept staring at it in his memories before. Now, Ptonomy is able to get a memory from the object itself and learn what really happened. David’s therapist, Poole caught him during the robbery, and David beat him severely, breaking his skull. Poole survived, it seems, but Syd concludes that David didn’t commit the robbery for drugs. He did it to erase whatever was on the tape.They also visit David’s ex-girlfriend. At first, Ptonomy and Syd pretend to be a couple looking for a house while Ptonomy reads her mind. He gets a vision of her visiting Poole at a lighthouse and is about to leave when Syd admits that they’re actually there to learn about David. It turns out his ex has been searching for him too. She also mentions that David had a friend he did drugs with. A man named Benny. Not the Lenny woman we’ve been seeing. What is going on? Syd asks if there’s anything she’d like them to say to David for her. She gets really quiet and scared. “They’re watching.” It appears Division 3 is closer to the trio than we think.Amber Midthunder as Kerry Loudermilk. (Photo via FX)That turns out to be exactly the case, as the next step in the investigation leads the team right into a trap. They travel to the lighthouse where Poole is apparently living and begin asking him questions about David. Once Poole starts asking specific questions about Melanie Bird, it becomes clear he’s not Poole at all. He’s The Eye, torture expert, and shapeshifter. With Division 3 troops closing in on the house, the trio race upstairs and we get a superhero action scene unlike any we’ve ever seen before. They run through the house, and Kerry jumps out of a window to take on some commandos head on. The episode cuts back and forth between her movements and Cary’s. They’re linked, which makes her eventual defeat even more painful. The team is captured, but Syd manages to switch bodies with The Eye. She loads her unconscious teammates (along with The Eye in her body) into a van and drives them to safety.While all this is going on David is sitting around in his subconscious astral plane. He meets Oliver, the narrator from the beginning of the episode. It appears Oliver is Melanie Birds former lover who has been comatose and trapped in an astral plane like David, since the ’70s. Oliver invites David into his ice room where he will be safe. It seems David brought the Devil with Yellow Eyes into the astral plane with him. Oliver describes the creature as a parasite living in David’s mind. The creature makes David forget it as soon as he sees it, which explains why he hasn’t brought up the thing with anyone. David and Oliver don’t exactly get on, so David decides to take his chances outside.It’s not long before he runs into Lenny, who torments him about being stuck in the astral plane while his friends are in trouble. She tells him they have to get out of his mind. She’s tired of being trapped inside and wants to get back into the real world. She shows him what’s happening with his friends, which gets him mad enough to teleport to their location. As she goads him on, she appears to morph into the Devil with Yellow Eyes. Yeah, I’ll admit that was a pretty disturbing image right before bed.Dan Stevens as David Haller, Rachel Keller as Syd Barrett (Photo via FX)David arrives too late to see that Syd and The Eye have switched bodies. He makes the truck crash and helps the person he thinks is Syd escape. The real Syd tries to chase They Eye down, but David tackles her, realizing only after it’s too late that they had switched. Once the bodies switch back, The Eye turns around and shoots Kerry. The episode then cuts between Kerry bleeding out, while Cary lies on the floor of his clinic in pain. As the episode ends, Lenny appears behind David, wrapping a demonic-looking hand around his shoulder.We are now halfway through the first season, and “Chapter Four” was its best episode so far. It expertly played with the unreliable narrator concept, using its abstract, confusing visuals to great effect. It even answered some of our most burning questions about the series, while raising so many more. It appears Lenny is the Devil with Yellow Eyes. Is that who she always was? Could anyone other than David (and Syd when she was in David’s body) see her at Clockworks? And why does Syd keep seeing the Angriest Boy in the World? Is that a projection from David, or are they still somewhere in his mind? We’ll probably get the answers to some of those questions next week. Knowing this show, though, that will only make us ask more.last_img read more

Alaskan researchers find evidence of genetic change in salmon in response to

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Alaskan researchers find evidence of genetic change in salmon in response to warming climate (2012, July 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-alaskan-evidence-genetic-salmon-response.html More information: Genetic change for earlier migration timing in a pink salmon population, Published online before print July 11, 2012, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.1158AbstractTo predict how climate change will influence populations, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms, particularly microevolution and phenotypic plasticity, that allow populations to persist in novel environmental conditions. Although evidence for climate-induced phenotypic change in populations is widespread, evidence documenting that these phenotypic changes are due to microevolution is exceedingly rare. In this study, we use 32 years of genetic data (17 complete generations) to determine whether there has been a genetic change towards earlier migration timing in a population of pink salmon that shows phenotypic change; average migration time occurs nearly two weeks earlier than it did 40 years ago. Experimental genetic data support the hypothesis that there has been directional selection for earlier migration timing, resulting in a substantial decrease in the late-migrating phenotype (from more than 30% to less than 10% of the total abundance). From 1983 to 2011, there was a significant decrease—over threefold—in the frequency of a genetic marker for late-migration timing, but there were minimal changes in allele frequencies at other neutral loci. These results demonstrate that there has been rapid microevolution for earlier migration timing in this population. Circadian rhythm genes, however, did not show any evidence for selective changes from 1993 to 2009. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2012 Phys.org The pink salmon in the study were part of a group that spawns in a stream near Juneau, Alaska. Prior research had shown that the salmon have been swimming upstream to spawn on average two weeks earlier than they did just forty years ago. They also found that average water temperature in the stream had risen one degree during that same time span. To find out if any genetic changes have come about as a result, the researchers turned to a genetic marker that has been bred into some, but not all of the fish during the late 1980’s, that tended to make them spawn a little bit later then the others in their group. Because genetic samples of the fish have been taken on a regular basis since the 1970’s, the team was able to see that the late spawning marker showed a decrease from 20% of the fish population on average to just 10%; a clear sign that genetic change over just a few decades had occurred. At the same time they found no other changes in other genes that had been marked as a control.The researchers say the evidence shows that salmon have evolved genetically over just a couple of generations which by implication means, that other animals are likely doing the same. Overall, they say, their study shows just how quickly organisms can evolve to deal with ongoing temperature changes. What they don’t know yet, however, is how earlier spawning impacts the fish in other ways, such as when the young fish swim back down stream and on out into the ocean. (Phys.org) — Because the gradual increase in temperatures worldwide is still relatively new, researchers have had difficulty in finding examples of genetic changes in organisms that are adapting to the warmer temperatures. Instead they have seen examples of phenotypic plasticity, which is where animals make adaptive changes based on existing conditions that are not brought about by genetic changes. Now though, for the first time, researchers in Alaska have found evidence of genetic changes in pink salmon that have come about over the past few decades as the fish have been migrating upstream earlier than they used to. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team describes how they found a genetic marker for late spawning fish diminishing over time as water temperatures increased. Explore further Scientists wonder where salmon arelast_img read more

2 injured as driver loses control on N11

first_imgAlso read: 3 vehicles involved in crash in busy Ladysmith streetTwo people sustained minor injuries and were taken to hospital for further medical attention.Emergency personnel and a towing service responded to the scene.Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Two people were injured last night (September 14) around midnight after a bakkie crashed on the N11.The driver of the vehicle allegedly lost control and the bakkie crashed outside Ladysmith.The vehicle was heading from Newcastle towards Ladysmith when the incident took place.Also read: 2 injured in evening crash in Lyell StreetAlso read: 10-year-old girl killed in tragic crash on her way to a funeral with her mother just outside Ladysmithlast_img read more

Editors Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at SCCT 2015

first_img Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. DAIC Editor Dave Fornell shares some of the most innovative new technologies shown on the expo floor and discusses in sessions at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2015 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:48Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:48 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports View all 9 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Women’s Health View all 62 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting.center_img Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 07, 2015 Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at SCCT 2015 Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Agents now have less than two weeks to become cert

first_imgAgents now have less than two weeks to become certified experts in Great Train Journeys – one of the industry’s fastest growing sectors – with Rail Plus’ first-ever dedicated GTJ training program set to close on 6 October, 2017.The GTJ Rail Expert program is a stand-alone training program focused exclusively on the world’s most enticing train voyages.The program offers eight modules, which explore leading train networks, journeys and regions. At the end of each module, agents are presented with 10 questions, which they have until midday on 6 October 2017 to answer.Every agent who achieves a 60% pass rate will graduate as a ‘GTJ Rail Expert’, and receive an e-certificate.The top graduate from the inaugural program will receive a $500 VISA Gift card, with prizes also on offer for second- ($250 VISA Gift card) and third-placed ($150 VISA Gift card) finishers. In addition, the top achiever for each modules will win a Kobo e-reader. agentsincentivesrailtraininglast_img read more

TEMPE Ariz — Bruce Arians always touts the impor

first_img TEMPE, Ariz. — Bruce Arians always touts the importance of veteran leadership to the Cardinals’ success. When it comes to the playoffs, however, Arizona’s longest-tenured players aren’t all veterans; they run the gamut of postseason experience.Some have Super Bowl savvy; others are nearly as green as the rookies who tasted the postseason for the first time in last week’s divisional round win over Green Bay. “I’ve made it this long and I hadn’t even won a playoff game until last week,” defensive tackle Frostee Rucker said. “It absolutely makes me appreciate this moment more than I might have as a rookie because of all the trials and tribulations of my career, but when I speak about the playoffs to the young guys, I’m speaking from inexperience myself.”The Cardinals have six veterans on their active roster with at least 10 years of NFL experience, along with defensive tackle Cory Redding (13 years), who is on injured reserve.Long snapper Mike Leach is the senior citizen with 16 years of NFL tenure. Dwight Freeney has 14 years of experience; QB Carson Palmer has 13; receiver Larry Fitzgerald and reserve outside linebacker Jason Babin have 12; and Rucker has 10.Palmer’s lack of playoff success was a major storyline last week against the Packers, but of the six aforementioned veterans who will take the field in Charlotte on Sunday when the Cardinals face the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game, only Babin (two games) has less postseason experience than Palmer.Sunday’s game will mark the fourth playoff game in Palmer’s career, and this will be Rucker’s fifth postseason game. Fitzgerald and Leach sit somewhere in the middle. This will be Fitzgerald’s ninth postseason game and Leach’s 10th. Top Stories The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact “It was great when he called me. I said ‘yeah, I am ready to get off the couch. Let’s go, man,’ and it has been a ride ever since.”Follow Craig Morgan on Twitter 0 Comments   Share   center_img Arizona Cardinals linebacker Dwight Freeney (54) salutes the fans with teammate Markus Golden (44) after his sack in Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco during the second half of an NFL football game, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri) Rucker said age also adds a sense of urgency.“When you come into the league your expiration date is already ticking,” he said. “You don’t know exactly how long you’ll get but they say the average life expectancy of an NFL player is three years. I feel fortunate to have made it this far so it’s clear to me that you have to take advantage of these rare opportunities.”The opportunities haven’t been as rare for Freeney, who has won a Super Bowl, played in two and competed in three conference championship games before Sunday’s. Even so, he couldn’t resist the chance for more — especially considering the state of his golf game while he sat in semi-retirement this fall, waiting for Arians to call.“I shot over 100 on the golf course one day and I was like, ‘Bruce, please, I need help,’” said Freeney, who signed a one-year deal with the Cardinals on Oct. 13. “He said just said ‘stay ready’ and I said ‘alright.’“I was one week away from retiring and I was actually doing some interviews and trying to figure out what I was going to do after, and he called me on the plane and the door was closing. The flight attendants were telling everyone to put away all cell phones. I am looking at my phone seeing that it is B.A. I am telling her to hold on; she is telling me to get off the phone. By contrast, Freeney will compete in his 19th postseason game on Sunday, giving him a resume that is both invaluable and difficult to impart on his teammates.“I try to help as much as I can, but it is hard to catch a guy up to speed,” he said. “Experience is the best learning tool that you have.”Freeney said there are areas where he can assist.“The young guys or older guys that haven’t been in it, just understanding about how things go in the playoffs,” he said. “Honestly, it is not much different than the regular season. The energy is picked up, yes. You will feel it in the building just because of what is on the line.“For the most part, it is just doing the same thing that you have always done. It is the team that has the least amount of mistakes in the game. It is more of a mental grind than a physical grind in the playoffs.”Two things all of Arizona’s veterans agree upon are these: their years of NFL service have given them a deeper appreciation of this moment, and a deeper understanding of how difficult it is to get here.“I kind of know what to expect,” Fitzgerald said. “The attention, the noise, everything that comes with playing deep into the playoffs: When you’re doing it at 25, I think it’s much different. It’s the first time you’ve ever experienced it and so it’s very new to you. I think that’s given me perspective this time around.” Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and sellinglast_img read more

9 of the best UK beaches you probably havent heard of

first_img5. Long Sands Beach, Tynemouth Scotland has some pretty incredible beaches, but this two-mile long stretch of sand really takes the biscuit. When you’re not basking on the shore, you can explore the caves or dip your toes in the Lunan Water: a shallow river that cuts the bay in half. Surfing and beach-combing are popular here, especially after storms when semi-precious gemstones can sometimes be spotted glinting in the sun. There’s even a ruined castle to explore – dating back to the 12th Century, it was built to protect the coast against Vikings. Search car hire at Bournemouth Airport Search car hire in Penzance 8. Knockvologan, Isle of Mull Search car hire from Swansea Airport Probably the most beautiful beach in the North East, Tynemouth’s Long Sands Beach has recently made headlines for its crystal clear waters. Tynemouth is just the second place in the country to nab itself  a Plastic Free Coastlines title – the other is Penzance. If bathing in the North Sea isn’t your thing, there’s a mile of pristine golden sands, perfect for sunbathing or playing beach games – Newcastle United sometimes train for matches here. Not to be confused with South Devon’s Broadsands beach, Broad Sands is part of North Devon’s wild coast. The double cove is a paradise for swimmers – the two shingle beaches are sheltered and calm, plus there are plenty of interesting rock formations. The adventurous will enjoy exploring the caves and tunnels, or swimming out to the island lookout spot. As it’s a wild beach, there are no lifeguards on duty, so remember to check the tides before diving in. 2. Porthcurno, Cornwall 1. Man o’ War Bay, Dorset Search car hire in Aberdeen Search cheap flights to Exeter Search flights to Swansea Search hotels in the Hebrides Just one day at these paradise bays is never enough, so make your British beach break a staycation to remember with our Fly Stay Save offer. You can unlock exclusive discounts for your hotel, B&B or hostel when you book a flight through Skyscanner, leaving you more money to spend on fish & chips. Search car hire from Exeter Airport ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map 7. Kingsgate Bay, Kent Seven miles of sandy, seaweed-free shoreline makes this Northern Irish beach a popular spot with sun-seeking locals. It’s split into different zones, with a dedicated area for water sports and a Blue Flag awarded section with a lifeguard on duty during high season. It’s backed onto by one of the largest dune systems in the UK and Ireland, and towered over by Benevenagh Mountain. On a clear day you can see all the way across to Scotland. Tucked between Penzance and Land’s End, Porthcurno is one of Britain’s best-kept beach secrets: unless you’re a fan of Poldark, in which case you’ll know it as Nampara Cove. The soft golden sands are lapped by turquoise waters and backed with rocky granite cliffs, making it a true summer paradise. If you’re not a strong swimmer, no worries – a gentle stream runs along one side of the beach, perfect for paddling. There’s also a lifeguard patrol all summer. Search flights to Newcastle Search hotels in Newcastle 6. Lunan Bay, Scotlandcenter_img Plan your trip to Broadstairs These alternative summer beach destinations are a dream for off-the-beaten path travellers. 3. Mwnt, Wales The Hebrides are renowned for their Barbados-like beaches, and Mull’s Knockvologan is one of the best examples. The crystal clear water is super shallow and calm, as the large Atlantic waves break on the outlying islands. The only indication you’re still in Scotland is the sheep happily grazing nearby – and the seals basking on the rocks. During low tide you can reach the Isle of Erraid, which inspired the classic Robert Louis Stevenson novel Kidnapped. As it’s just a two hour drive from London, Kingsgate Bay is the perfect escape from sweltering summer days in the capital. Despite this, it’s surprisingly peaceful: it doesn’t have its own car park, so is much quieter than its popular neighbours Joss Bay and Botany Bay. The dramatic white cliffs form a dramatic backdrop, and are home to some of the country’s best sea caves. The bay gets cut off at high tide, so keep an eye on the time and look out for the beach patrols – they’ll tell you when to start heading back. Search car hire in London 4. Broad Sands, Exmoor Search flights to Bournemouth Want more tales of paradise beaches? Search flights to Aberdeen Search flights to Penzance If you like your sun, sea and sand with a side of culture, check out these half-beach/half-city break destinations ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepartReturnCabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map This sheltered sandy beach, owned by the National Trust, is the perfect spot to get back to nature. The neat rectangle of soft golden sand is backed by steep cliffs and towered over by the Foel y Mwnt headland – climb up and you might be lucky enough to spot pods of dolphins playing off the coast.  As a Green Coast award winner, Mwnt has Blue Flag quality water without the bustling infrastructure. So there are no huge hotels or restaurants to spoil the view – just a small kiosk if you fancy an ice cream. One of the Jurassic Coast’s most underrated beaches, this pretty cove sits between two headlands: Man o’ War Head and (the fantastically named) Durdle Door. To reach the bay, you need to walk down a steep 800-metre track. The effort is well worth it. When you reach the bottom you’ll be rewarded with a peaceful stretch of beach, with a fine mix of sand and pebbles. Since it’s well-sheltered, the waters tend to be calm and shallow. It’s ideal for swimming or, if you’re feeling adventurous, stand-up paddle-boarding through the limestone arch. Search car hire in Glasgow 9. Benone Strand, Northern Ireland Our list of 10 of the best beaches in Wales proves that there’s more to the valleys than, well, valleys. Search flights to Derry Search car hire in Derry Related20 of the best beaches in Europe that the locals don’t want you to know aboutPlanning a beach holiday and looking for a quiet spot where you won’t have to battle for an umbrella? Beat the miserable British summer by planning your escape to one of these secret beaches across Europe that you’ve probably never heard of…Alternative beach holidays for summerFancy a beach holiday, but don’t want to battle through the crowds to find a good spot for your towel? We’ve rounded-up some exciting destinations that are a little off the beaten track – some in far-flung countries such as Japan and Malaysia, while others are a little closer to…10 stunning beaches in Wales that will make you think you’re in the CaribbeanLooking for a bank holiday break, or even a summer holiday that doesn’t cost a fortune or involve a long flight? Well Wales has all the right ingredients, including some pretty stunning beaches. Whether you’re in search of a quiet beach for a fun family break, or an isolated cove…last_img read more